Czech Republic Travel Information

Last modified: July 31, 2023
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No airport tax is levied on passengers upon embarkation at the airport.

Entry to the Czech Republic

You are only allowed to enter the Czech Republic for essential reasons, such as work, medical treatment or family reunion, or if you hold residency or a valid long-term visa for the Czech Republic. Entry for tourism is not permitted. UK nationals resident in the Czech Republic who applied for a residence permit before 31 December 2020 but haven’t received the Certificate of Residence yet can request a “confirmation for entry” from the website of the Czech Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Some flights between the UK and the Czech Republic have been cancelled. You should check with your airline operator before travelling. The RegioJet coach service between the UK and the Czech Republic is not currently operating. Please check on the status of services before you plan to travel.

If you have spent more than 12 hours in the UK during the previous 14 days, you must present a negative RT-PCR test that has been taken in the UK no longer than 72 hours before departure. On arrival in the Czech Republic, you must self-isolate for at least 5 days, before undertaking a further RT-PCR test between 5-7 days after arrival. A negative test result ends this period of self-isolation. If you test negative, you will need to wear a FFP2 standard facemask or higher when you are outdoors (available in Czech pharmacies and known in Czech as “respirátor”) after ending self-isolation up until 14 days after arrival. You are also required to fill in the Passenger Locator Form and present it upon arrival. You should consult your airline operator before travelling.

Details on regulations in place for travellers, permitted reasons for entry, and more information on entry requirements and local restrictions can be found on the website of the Czech Ministry of Interior.

You are allowed to transit the Czech Republic, but you need to present either a negative RT-PCR test result (no older than 72 hours before departure), or a negative antigen test result (no older than 24 hours before departure) upon entry.

If you are legally permitted to travel, check our advice for the country you are visiting and each country that you would transit. Some other countries have closed their border with the Czech Republic in some areas, and may further restrict movement or bring in new rules including testing requirements with little warning.

You should not use the NHS testing service to get a test in order to facilitate your travel to another country. You should arrange to take a private test.

Regular entry requirements

The information on this part of the page covers the most common types of travel and reflects the UK government’s understanding of the rules currently in place. Unless otherwise stated, this information is for travellers using a full ‘British Citizen’ passport.

The authorities in the country or territory you’re travelling to are responsible for setting and enforcing the rules for entry. If you’re unclear about any aspect of the entry requirements, or you need further reassurance, you’ll need to contact the embassy, high commission or consulate of the country or territory you’re travelling to.

You should also consider checking with your transport provider or travel company to make sure your passport and other travel documents meet their requirements.

Visas

The rules for travelling or working in European countries changed on 1 January 2021:

  • you can travel to countries in the Schengen area for up to 90 days in any 180-day period without a visa. This applies if you travel as a tourist, to visit family or friends, to attend business meetings, cultural or sports events, or for short-term studies or training
  • if you are travelling to the Czech Republic and other Schengen countries without a visa, make sure your whole visit is within the 90-day limit. Visits to Schengen countries within the previous 180 days before you travel count towards your 90 days
  • to stay longer, to work or study, for business or for other reasons, you will need to meet the Czech government’s entry requirements. Check with the Embassy of the Czech Republic what type of visa and/or work permit you may need
  • if you stay in the Czech Republic with a visa or permit, this does not count towards your the 90-day visa-free limit
  • Any time you spent in the Czech Republic or other Schengen countries before 1 January 2021 does not count towards your 90-day visa-free limit.

At Czech border control, you may need to use separate lanes from EU, EEA and Swiss citizens when queueing. Your passport may be stamped on entry and exit. You may also need to:

  • show a return or onward ticket
  • show you have enough money for your stay

There are separate requirements for those who are resident in the Czech Republic. If you are resident in the Czech Republic, you should carry proof of residence as well as your valid passport when you travel. For further information on these requirements, see our Living in the Czech Republic guide.

Passport validity

Check your passport is valid for travel before you book your trip, and renew your passport if you do not have enough time left on it.

You must have at least 6 months left on an adult or child passport to travel to most countries in Europe (not including Ireland).

If you renewed your current passport before the previous one expired, extra months may have been added to its expiry date. Any extra months on your passport over 10 years may not count towards the 6 months needed.

UK Emergency Travel Documents

UK Emergency Travel Documents (ETDs) are accepted for entry, airside transit and exit from the Czech Republic.

Crime

Most visitors to the Czech Republic experience no difficulties but you should be aware of street crime and petty theft, particularly in Prague.

Prague city police advise visitors to:

  • always exchange currency at a currency exchange office or bank, never on the street as this money is often counterfeit
  • avoid contact with women and men acting as street prostitutes as they are often pickpockets
  • take care when using cash machines
  • the sale and distribution of drugs is illegal and the drugs are often hazardous counterfeits
  • be aware of consumption charges in night clubs; they are often high. Be careful with consumption cards, which carry high financial penalties if they are lost before the bill is paid

Take care of yourself and your belongings in the same way as you would do in the UK. Take precautions against pickpockets and bag snatchers and don’t leave your belongings or food / drinks unattended.

Petty theft is a problem, especially in major tourist areas in Prague. Try to avoid busy carriages on the metro and trams, which are favoured by pickpockets. There is also a risk of pick-pocketing on flights from the UK. It is best to keep your passport and valuables with you before and during your flight.

Beware of bogus plain-clothes policemen, who may ask to see your foreign currency and passport. If approached, don’t show your money, but offer instead to go with them to the nearest police station. If you suspect that you are dealing with a bogus police officer, you can call 158 or 112 to check their identity. No police officer in the Czech Republic has the right to check your money or its authenticity.

Report any thefts in person to the Czech police within 24 hours and get a police report crime number. Prague police station (Jungmannovo namesti 9, Prague 1 – nearest metro stop is Mustek) is open 24 hours and has English translators. There’s also a police station at the airport where you can get a police report. It’s possible to obtain a reference number for a crime related incident by reporting it to a police station in the UK, but it’s much better to report the crime in the Czech Republic.

If your passport is lost or stolen you will need to get a police report and apply for an Emergency Travel Document from the British Embassy in Prague.

Every lamppost in Prague has a 6-digit number posted at eye-level. Should you need assistance from the police or emergency services, these codes will help pinpoint your location if you’re unable to offer an exact address.

Local travel

If you’re travelling in a group keep a careful note of your hotel telephone number and address in case you are separated from the rest of your party. Leave contact details of your travelling companions with a friend or relative at home who you can contact if you get separated from your group.

Every year there are accidents involving trams. Take extra care when near tram tracks and make sure you look both ways. Trams can’t stop quickly.

Seasonal flooding (normally during the Spring) occurs occasionally. Check the Ministry of Agriculture website for more information. By selecting ‘Enter’ you’ll see a map of the country which showing any current flood warnings.

Taxis

It’s safer to use a major taxi company like Tick Tack tel: 14 144 or AAA tel: 233 113 311. If you do pick up a taxi in the street, always check the fare per km before getting in. Some taxis can charge highly inflated prices. The rates should be clearly marked on the side of the taxi.

Road travel

In 2019 there were 617 road deaths in the Czech Republic (source: Department for Transport). This equates to 5.8 road deaths per 100,000 of population and compares to the UK average of 2.6 road deaths per 100,000 of population in 2019.

Licences and documents

You can drive using a UK driving licence.

If you’re living in Czech Republic, check the Living in Guide for information on requirements for residents.

Driving standards

In 2018 there were 656 road deaths in Czech Republic (source: Department of Transport). This equates to 6.2 road deaths per 100,000 of population and compares to the UK average of 2.8 road deaths per 100,000 of population in 2018.

Driving regulations

To drive on motorways you’ll need to buy a special vignette (sticker) from a Post Office, petrol station, bureau de change or at the border. Failure to display a valid vignette can result in a fine. More information about vignettes can be found on the website of the Czech Ministry of Transport.

There is a zero-tolerance policy for driving under the influence of alcohol or other drugs.

You must have your headlights on dipped beam when driving anywhere in the Czech Republic, even during the hours of daylight.

All private cars, including those of foreign visitors, must carry the following items by law:

  • fluorescent green high visibility safety jacket
  • first aid kit, warning triangle
  • complete set of spare bulbs
  • complete set of electric fuses
  • jack
  • spanner
  • spare wheel or special tyres repair set

You need winter tyres between 1 November and 31 March.

For further information visit the website of the Czech Ministry of Transport and see the European CommissionAA and RAC guides on driving in the Czech Republic.

If you’re planning to drive to the Czech Republic, you may like to consult the green line motoring helpline run by the Czech Central Automobile Club (UAMK), which has information available in Czech and English (telephone: 00 420 1230).

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