Estonia Travel Information

Last modified: July 26, 2023
You are here:
Estimated reading time: 7 min

The information on this page covers the most common types of travel and reflects the UK government’s understanding of the rules currently in place. Unless otherwise stated, this information is for travellers using a full ‘British Citizen’ passport.

If you are resident in Estonia you should carry your Estonian ID card or residence permit, as well as your valid passport when you travel. If you have applied for your residence permit but have not received it, you can carry your certificate of application.

If you have not yet applied for a residence card, you should carry evidence that you are resident in Estonia. This could include a tenancy agreement or a utility bill in your name that ideally dates from 2020.

If you cannot show that you are resident in Estonia, you may be asked additional questions at the border to enter the Schengen area, and your passport may be stamped. This will not affect your rights in Estonia.

Full information about entry requirements for foreigners is available on the website of the Estonian Police and Border Guard Board. You can also contact customer support line by calling +372 6123000.

The authorities in the country or territory you’re travelling to are responsible for setting and enforcing the rules for entry. If you’re unclear about any aspect of the entry requirements, or you need further reassurance, you’ll need to contact the embassy, high commission or consulate of the country or territory you’re travelling to.

You should also consider checking with your transport provider or travel company to make sure your passport and other travel documents meet their requirements.

Restrictions in response to coronavirus

Travel restrictions and borders

Travellers from the UK are required to produce a negative PCR COVID-19 test, undertaken no more than 72 hours before departure, and self-isolate for 10 days. This rule also applies to passengers who transited the United Kingdom as part of their journey to Estonia. Those who are unable to provide such a test result will need to be tested on arrival in Estonia.

Travellers from the UK cannot work after the first negative test, but can participate in unavoidable family events. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from the test.

The period of self-isolation can be shortened by a second negative test taken seven days after arrival. To book a second test, contact the call centre for public testing on +372 678 0000. Please read the guidelines for more information From 1 February, the 10-day self-isolation and COVID-19 testing are not mandatory for: * individuals who tested positive for COVID-19 and declared cured no longer than six months ago; or * individuals who have undergone COVID-19 vaccination less than six months ago

What is accepted as proof of being cured of Covid-19?

A print-out from the Estonian electronic health system portal is accepted as proof of being cured of Covid-19. The data on the printout should include personal details of the person affected, analysis methodology, analysis result, the place where analysis was conducted, the time of the analysis, the name of the institution that conducted the analysis and the institution details.

Individuals who tested positive with Covid-19 or were declared cured in any other country less than six months ago should present a doctor’s certificate from that country stating they are cured of Covid-19. The certificate should include personal details of the person affected, analysis methodology, analysis result, the place where analysis was conducted, the time of the analysis, the name of the institution that conducted the analysis and the institution details. The certificate can be in Estonian, English or Russian language and can be done in Latin or Cyrillic alphabet. An officially certified print-out from another country’s digital health system will also be accepted.

What is accepted as proof of Covid-19 vaccination?

A print-out from the Estonian electronic health system portal is accepted as proof of being vaccinated against Covid-19 if vaccination is done in Estonia. An immunisation passport, a copy of an immunisation passport or vaccination certificate is accepted as proof of being vaccinated against Covid -19 for individuals who received vaccination in any other country. The certificate should include personal details of the person affected, analysis methodology, analysis result, the place where analysis was conducted, the time of the analysis, the name of the institution that conducted the analysis and the institution details. The certificate can be in Estonian, English or Russian language and can be done in Latin or Cyrillic alphabet. The officially certified print out from other country’s digital health system will also be accepted.

Further information about the conditions that apply to test certificates in Estonian.

Travellers without symptoms arriving from other high–risk countries (150 cases or more per 100,000 people for the previous 14 days) are also required to self-isolate for 10 days. To shorten the self-isolation period, a negative PCR COVID-19 test needs to be taken no more than 72 hours before departure or a test taken on arrival in Estonia. A second negative test no earlier than 6 days after the initial test will allow you to exit self-isolation.

See the Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs for the full list of allowed entries, including from the UK and some other non-EU or EEA countries.

All passengers arriving in Estonia must submit a customer locator form. This can be done at the port of entry or electronically via the Health Board portal before arrival.

Quarantine requirements

Travellers without symptoms arriving from countries where the COVID-19 infection rate is 150 cases or lower per 100,000 people for the previous 14 days before arrival do not need to self-quarantine on entry.

If you’re arriving in Estonia from the UK, you will need to produce a negative PCR COVID-19 test undertaken no more than 72 hours before departure and self-isolate for 10 days. Those who are unable to provide such a test result will need to be tested on arrival in Estonia.

Full details on testing for coronavirus in Estonia can be found on the Estonian Health Board website. See also information on arranging private testing in Estonia.

You should not use the NHS testing service to get a test in order to facilitate your travel to another country. You should arrange to take a private test.

Information on restriction of movement and quarantine requirements together with a list of countries from which arrivals are not required to self-quarantine is available on the Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs’ website and is updated every Friday.

You should follow the local quarantine measures of the country that you are in.

If you need further information about entry requirements, contact the Estonian Police and Border Guard Board, customer support +372 6123000 or the nearest Estonian embassy or consulate. You should also check with your airline or travel company for the latest information.

Regular entry requirements

Visas

The rules for travelling or working in European countries changed on 1 January 2021:

  • you can travel to countries in the Schengen area for up to 90 days in any 180-day period without a visa. This applies if you travel as a tourist, to visit family or friends, to attend business meetings, cultural or sports events, or for short-term studies or training
  • if you are travelling to Estonia and other Schengen countries without a visa, make sure your whole visit is within the 90-day limit. Visits to Schengen countries within the previous 180 days before you travel count towards your 90 days
  • to stay longer, to work or study, for business travel or for other reasons, you will need to meet the Estonian government’s entry requirements. Check with the Estonian Embassy what type of visa and/or work permit you may need
  • if you stay in Estonia with a visa or permit, this does not count towards your 90-day visa-free limit

Any time you spent in Estonia or other Schengen countries before 1 January 2021 does not count towards your 90-day visa-free limit.

At Estonian border control, you may need to use separate lanes from EU, EEA and Swiss citizens when queueing. Your passport may be stamped on entry and exit. You may also need to:

  • show a return or onward ticket
  • show you have enough money for your stay.

There are separate requirements for those who are resident in Estonia. If you are resident in Estonia, you should carry proof of residence as well as your valid passport when you travel. For further information on these requirements, see our Living in Estonia guide.

Passport validity

Check your passport is valid for travel before you book your trip, and renew your passport if you do not have enough time left on it.

You must have at least 6 months left on an adult or child passport to travel to most countries in Europe (not including Ireland). This requirement does not apply if you are entering or transiting to Estonia, or if you are resident in Estonia.

If you renewed your current passport before the previous one expired, extra months may have been added to its expiry date. Any extra months on your passport over 10 years may not count towards the 6 months needed.

UK Emergency Travel Documents

UK Emergency Travel Documents (ETDs) are accepted for entry, airside transit and exit from Estonia.

Crime  

Crime levels are low although there is some petty crime. Pick pocketing can be a problem in bars, pubs, nightclubs and hotels in Tallinn’s Old Town when tourists are targeted for passports and cash. Be vigilant in bars, don’t leave your drink unattended, take sensible precautions and avoid unlit side streets and parks at night. If possible, leave your valuables in a hotel safe.

If you wish to report a theft, you should do so in person to Tallinn Central Police Station, Kolde pst 65, 10321 Tallinn, telephone: +372 612 5400.

Public transport

A plastic smartcard and e-ticket system is in use in Tallinn for buses, trolleybuses, trams and inner-city trains. Information on buying and using smartcards can be found on the Tallinn Tourism website.

Taxis are widely available and reasonably priced. Transport apps like Bolt, Taxigo and Uber are also widely used. Make sure there’s a price list on the back window of the taxi, the taxi driver has a licence in a visible place, that there’s a visible meter and that it’s being used. Don’t use taxis that are unmarked; they’re illegal, unsafe and usually cost a lot more than registered taxis. Take extra care to avoid fake taxis in Tallinn Passenger Port.

Local travel

Roads and pavements may become very slippery during spring. In accordance with the Estonian Traffic Act, all pedestrians walking on the road at night time or in inadequate visibility must wear a safety reflector, otherwise fines may apply. Reflectors are essential during winter months from October to March. The reflectors can be pinned to the right side of your coat or handbag and can be bought locally.

Road travel

In 2019 there were 52 road deaths in the Estonia (source: Department for Transport). This equates to 3.9 road deaths per 100,000 of population and compares to the UK average of 2.6 road deaths per 100,000 of population in 2019.

Licences and documents

You can drive in Estonia with a UK driving licence. You must have the original V5C vehicle registration document if you’re driving into Estonia. More information is available on the website of the Estonian road administration.

If you’re living in Estonia, check the Living in Guide for information on requirements for residents.

Driving regulations

By law, headlights of vehicles must be on at all times, including during daylight hours. Winter tyres must be fitted from 1 December to 1 March every year, but if there are severe weather conditions outside these dates (likely in most years) the dates will change accordingly. Check local conditions if you are driving in Estonia between October and April.

Do not drink and drive. The legal limit is zero. Those found over the limit face a fine and possible imprisonment.

See the European CommissionAA and RAC guides on driving in Estonia.

Road safety

Winter travel

Be prepared for extremely cold and possibly hazardous weather in the winter (October to March). There is likely to be snow on the ground and temperatures may drop to -25°C or below.

Let our experts handle your excess baggage. Reach out to us today!

Was this article helpful?
Dislike 0
Views: 58
Previous: Customs regulations for your trip to Estonia
0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

© Copyright - World Baggage Network